Home / Energy / Two-thirds of Americans want U.S. to back global climate deal: NYT/CBS poll
U.S. President Barack Obama speaks at the COP21 session of statements by heads of state and government at the climate summit in Paris, France November 30, 2015. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

Two-thirds of Americans want U.S. to back global climate deal: NYT/CBS poll

PARIS – Two-thirds of Americans think the United States should join a legally binding global climate change agreement, a poll by CBS News and the New York Times released on Monday said.

But the poll, conducted between Nov. 18 and Nov. 22, showed Americans were divided on what domestic measures the United States should take to curb greenhouse gas emissions.

The poll showed 63 percent of Americans favored regulations to cut carbon emissions from power plants, while 31 percent opposed them.

The public was split on whether the United States should restrict drilling for oil and gas on public lands, with 49 percent in favor and 45 percent opposed.

Far fewer of those polled supported any new taxes on electricity or gasoline use.

The show of public support comes as the United States tries to play a leadership role in securing a global climate agreement in Paris over the next two weeks of negotiations.

The poll story can be found by clicking here.

In related news, Why are oil and gas companies calling for more action on climate change?

(Reporting by Valerie Volcovici; Editing by Janet Lawrence)

This article was from Reuters and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network.